TERRACOTTA WARRIORS MUSEUM





We got an early start today and headed about an hour and a half outside of Xian city to where the Museum of the Terracotta Warriors is located. I must admit -- it felt good to see some more of the mountainous areas and not more of the cement buildings -- which are typical around the world. We stopped at a factory nearby which explained the process of how these warriors were actually made. (see shot of Daisy) But it can't compare with walking into the pits, with huge overhangs and seeing these artifacts all lined up -- The emperor thought that he was preparing himself for the next life and that he would have set up for battle as well. He thought that he would be able to rule from the next life - well apart from him being in for a big surprise -- we on this side of eternity have the pleasure of being able to see the great effort that went into this endeavor. This was all uncovered just in 1975 by some farmers -- one of which sits at a table in the main entry hall, and is on display(but no photos please).

(From the Web)
Upon ascending the throne at the age of 13 (in 246 BC), Qin Shi Huang, later the first Emperor of all China, had begun to work for his mausoleum. It took 11 years to finish. It is speculated that many buried treasures and sacrificial objects had accompanied the emperor in his after life. A group of peasants uncovered some pottery while digging for a well nearby the royal tomb in 1974. It caught the attention of archaeologists immediately. They came to Xian in droves to study and to extend the digs. They had established beyond doubt that these artifacts were associated with the Qin Dynasty (211-206 BC).

The State Council authorized to build a museum on site in 1975. When completed, people from far and near came to visit. Xian and the Museum of Qin Terra Cotta Warriors and Horses have become landmarks on all travelers' itinerary.

enjoy the shots....

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